Tag Archives: ethics policy

We keep AP working

BARGAINING: Guild, AP agree to revisions to social media and ethics policy

The News Media Guild and The Associated Press signed off Wednesday on changes to the company’s social media and ethics policy.

The company agreed to remove proposed language that would have discouraged employees from “over-the-top, fawning praise” on social media directed at sports teams and celebrities. The AP also agreed to delete proposed language that would have prohibited staffers from cheering for national teams on social media during international sporting events like the Olympics.

The AP also agreed to remove a requirement that all employees get advance permission from a manager before pursuing freelance work.

The changes are updates to existing policies that were previously negotiated by the Guild and AP. For reference, the current social media policy is available here and the current ethics policy is available here.

Representing the Guild were Jill Bleed of Little Rock, Vin Cherwoo of New York Sports, technician Ed Morsett of Denver and Guild administrator Kevin Keane.

Representing the AP were Keisa Caesar, human resources generalist and project manager; Jean Maye, human resources director; Steve Macri, AP’s attorney; Brian Carovillano, managing editor; and John Daniszewski, vice president for standards.

Bargaining will resume Feb. 8.

We keep AP working

BARGAINING: AP agrees to revise social media and ethics proposal

The Associated Press on Monday agreed to revise its proposed social media and ethics proposal after hearing concerns from the News Media Guild bargainers, who said the company’s initial plan was too far-reaching.

Both sides met Monday as bargaining resumed in Washington, D.C. The AP agreed to keep in place its existing social media policy, with a few minor changes to eliminate redundant language. The new proposal will be posted at www.newsmediaguild.org later Monday.

 Also Monday, the Guild told the AP that it’s reviewing the company’s counter-proposal to increase paid parental leave from one week to four weeks paid. Upon questioning from the Guild, the company said the paid parental leave could be taken within the first 12 months of the birth or adoption of a child.

Representing the Guild were Jill Bleed of Little Rock, Vin Cherwoo of New York Sports, technician Ed Morsett of Denver and Guild administrator Kevin Keane.

Representing the AP were Montrese Garner-Sampson, regional HR manager; Jessica Bruce, senior vice president for human resources and corporate communications; Steve Macri, AP’s attorney; Jean Maye, human resources director; and Brian Carovillano, managing editor.

Guild bargainers were also greeted Monday by about 20 members of the Washington staff, who held signs outside the AP building that read “AP’s health care proposal is enough to make you sick” and “We stand with our negotiators to get us a #fairapcontract.” The bargaining team planned to meet later Monday night with unit members in Washington.

Bargaining resumes Tuesday, when both sides plan to discuss job security and the company’s proposal on transfers.

We keep AP working

BARGAINING: AP discusses job security proposal, ethics policy

The Associated Press on Tuesday detailed its job security proposal to the News Media Guild, saying the plan is intended to better reflect AP’s current organizational structure.

Now, in cases of staff reductions, seniority is determined by bureau or business locations. The AP’s proposal would determine seniority by “organizational units,” which it would define as: U.S. News, International News, Washington News, Global Enterprise, Global Investigations, Sports News, Business News, Health & Science News, Entertainment News, Religion News, Nerve Center, News Operations, Digital News, News Research, Data Center, Broadcast and Photos.

The company proposal also says that no employee could bump any other employee who is assigned to a different organizational unit and/or different business location. It would also reduce the amount of time that a laid-off employee is on the company’s recall list from the current 18 months to six months.

The Guild is still reviewing how the proposal would affect members’ seniority in the event of a staff reduction. The Guild previously introduced its own job security proposal that calls for increased training in the event of job reductions, including those caused by automation.

Also Tuesday, the Guild pressed the company for more details on its proposed ethics and social media policy. The Guild told the AP that many sections of the proposal are overly broad, including one that would prohibit employees for cheering for sports teams on social media.  AP Standards Editor John Daniszewski was present to answer the Guild’s questions on the proposal.

The company agreed to make several changes to the ethics policy at the Guild’s request, and both sides agreed to further discuss the social media policy at a later date.

Representing the Guild were Jill Bleed of Little Rock, Vin Cherwoo of New York Sports, technician Dave Herron of Seattle and Guild administrator Kevin Keane.

Representing the AP were Alison Quan, director of human resources, technology and business operations; Keisa Caesar, human resources generalist and project manager; Sue Gilkey; global director of employee benefits; Jean Maye, human resources director; AP’s attorney Steve Macri; Jessica Bruce, senior vice president for human resources and corporate communications; David Scott, deputy managing editor; and Ellen Fegan, vice president for internal audit.

Bargaining resumes Wednesday.

We keep AP working

BARGAINING: AP Proposes Revisions to Ethics Policy

Associated Press employees would be unable to make social media posts that cheer for any national team in sporting competitions under a proposed ethics policy introduced Tuesday by The Associated Press.

The AP’s proposal would prohibit all employees from making social media posts on sports and entertainment in which there is “trash-talking and over-the-top, fawning praise directed at teams, athletes and celebrities. In international competitions, AP staffers should not cheer for any national team.”

The AP and News Media Guild resumed bargaining in New York on Tuesday. AP’s proposal on ethics makes numerous additions on standards as well as social media postings.

The company’s ethics proposal also adds new sections on data journalism, offensive and gory content and updates AP’s policies on the use of obscenities, profanities, vulgarities, hate and propaganda.

The proposal includes the language: “The policies set forth in these pages are central to the AP’s mission. Any failure to abide by them could result in disciplinary action, up to including dismissal, depending on the gravity of the infraction.”

Meanwhile, the Guild introduced proposals Tuesday for its Technology Unit contract. The proposals largely mirror ones introduced last month for the Editorial Unit and include 5 percent annual raises for each of the next three years, 12 weeks paid parental leave upon the birth or adoption of a child and increased differentials for night and weekend work.

The Guild also pressed the company for more information about AP’s parking policy when a bureau moves from a location with free parking to one with paid parking.

Representing the News Media Guild were Jill Bleed of Little Rock, Vin Cherwoo of New York Sports, technician Ed Morsett of Denver and Guild administrator Kevin Keane.

Representing the AP were: Alison Quan, director of human resources, technology and business operations;  Keisa Caesar, human resources generalist and project manager; Sue Gilkey; global director of employee benefits; Jean Maye, human resources director; AP’s attorney Steve Macri and David Scott, deputy managing editor.

Bargaining resumes Wednesday.

AP to NMG: We don’t have list of overstaffed bureaus

The Associated Press doesn’t have a list of overstaffed bureaus, the company said Monday as it tried to explain the reasons for its job transfers proposal.

The company formally presented the language for forced transfers, which would allow the AP to move Guild-covered staffers rather than fire them and also to move people from overstaffed bureaus to open jobs.

The Guild told the AP that staffers are unhappy with the proposal and that its attempt to get employees who came to the table last week in Washington, D.C. _ Jill Bleed and Vicki Smith _ to push the idea with colleagues didn’t work.

“This proposal is destructive to staffers and staffers’ families,” Guild President Martha Waggoner said. “It’s an old proposal that the staff didn’t like years ago and doesn’t like now, combined with one that would ignore seniority rights and allow the company to force qualified long-service employees to accept transfers or be discharged.” Continue reading